Perfect Bound Printing

Perfect bound printing or perfect binding is a type of printing that involves attaching the paper to the spine of the book where the edges are hidden in the book binding. This gives each book a beautiful and very professional appearance. Also, many people love the feel of a perfect bound book in their hands, as most novels and other paperback books are made using perfect bound printing.

Perfect Bound Printing

Perfect Bound Printing Uses:

  • Textbooks
  • Self Publishing Books
  • Novels
  • Larger Booklets
  • Corporate Reports
  • Manuals
  • Annual Reports

Chromatic can work hand in hand with you on your perfect bound printing job delivering a quality and professional end product. For more information about your printing needs please email info@chromaticinc.com or call (818) 242-5785.

Bookbinding is quite a unique service to offer and most customers are not aware that there are various forms of binding available. Perfect bound printing and binding refers to a book that has been printed and bound so that a flexible adhesive attaches a paper cover to the spine of the assembled book.

What is Perfect Binding?

Perfect binding puts all the pages or signatures together, roughens and flattens the edge, and then a flexible adhesive attaches the paper cover to the spine. Paperback novels are one example of perfect binding. Booklets, telephone directories, and some magazines use perfect binding methods. Compared to other binding methods, perfect binding is quite durable and has a low to medium cost. It can be used with publications that are several inches thick.

A variation of traditional perfect binding is lay-flat or Eurobind binding where the cover is glued only to the sides of the spine so that a perfect bound book can lay flat when open. Also, some books may combine glue with sewn together signatures.

Do-It-Yourself Perfect Book Binding

You can bind your own books using a DIY version of perfect binding. Basically, you will:

  • clamp together the pages of your book
  • roughen the edges of the spine a bit with some sandpaper
  • apply a good dose of glue to the spine
  • let the glue dry
  • apply more glue
  • attach a pre-folded cover over the book

Of course these are just basic guidelines; it’s always best to have a professional book binding company take care of this since it can be quite difficult to master. There are other types of binding that you can also take a look at, they are:

Ring Binding

Securing loose printed pages in a soft or hard-covered book with rings that hold the pages through holes punched in the pages is ring binding. 3-ring binders (think school days) are common but binders may have any number of rings. A single ring is also a form of ring binding. Covers are less common. Single sheets of paper or cards (often laminated) are punched with a single hole, usually in a top corner, and then put on a ring that snaps open and closed. Ring binders come in many thicknesses and colors, can be imprinted or embossed, may be plastic, heavy paper or board, leather or fabric covered, and include pockets for inserting loose documents.

Thermal Binding

A method of securing loose printed pages with a strip of tape or plastic strips fused with heat is known as thermal binding. One of the advantages of thermal binding is that it allows documents to lay flat when opened, is sturdy, and neat. If you use covers with thermal binding you can match the tape to the cover for a sleek, almost invisible look or use contrasting colors, making the tape appear less utilitarian and more like a design element for the outside of the book or report. You can purchase thermal binding machines designed for home or office use if you’ll be doing a small quantities of thermal binding on a frequent basis.

Perfect Bound Printing – More Information

Perfect bound printing is a method of bookbinding where a flexible adhesive attaches a paper cover to the spine of the assembled signatures is called perfect binding. Perfect binding puts all the pages or signatures together, roughens and flattens the edge, and then a flexible adhesive attaches the paper cover to the spine. Paperback novels are one example of perfect binding.

Booklets, telephone directories, and some magazines use perfect binding methods. Compared to other binding methods, perfect binding is quite durable and has a low to medium cost. It can be used with publications that are several inches thick. A variation of traditional perfect binding is lay-flat or Eurobind binding where the cover is glued only to the sides of the spine so that a perfect bound book can lay flat when open. Also, some books may combine glue with sewn together signatures. Authors commonly use perfect binding for fiction and non-fiction books because of its professional appearance and relatively low cost. For the very same reasons, businesses and organizations frequently use the perfect binding method on a variety of printing projects such as corporate reports, manuals, catalogs and thicker product brochures.

Perfect bound printing has various benefits. It is less expensive than hardcover printing methods, it allows for a high page count, and it can be used for short production runs. This is also a popular printing method for on demand ordering. Books can be made with a heavier weight cover for durability and longevity and this method also forms a flat spinal edge which can be printed upon. The finished shape allows books to stack well for storage and display and perfect binding provides a crisp, professional appearance.

All book printers have certain page sizes they offer as standard sizes. These standard sizes are determined by the type of production equipment used by the printer. Designing your page size to conform to one of your printer’s standard page sizes will optimize the production of your book and keep the cost as low as possible. Conversely, a book designed with non-standard page dimensions may not match well with any of your printer’s presses. As a result, the production run would be inefficient and have a poor paper yield. The excess paper becomes waste and can add quite substantially to the cost of a book project. Knowing which page sizes your printer can produce most economically is good to know before starting on the layout of your book. I’m not trying to discourage creativity or unique design, but sometimes tweaking your page dimensions by as little as 1/2” could result in huge cost savings.

Perfect bound printing is ideal for many books but it is not recommended for books that are less than 1/8” thick. This is because a thin book has a page block with a very narrow edge, and this narrow edge will not provide enough surface area for the glue to bind the pages and cover together securely. For best results, books less than 1/8” thick should be created with another binding method, such as Saddle-Stitching or Spiral Coil Binding.